Massachusetts is Leading the Media Literacy Charge

Welcome to the Labragirl Film Project’s weekly film literacy discussion. Every Monday we provide a resource, activity, or methodological conversation to help you bring film analysis into your classroom. This week we want to bring attention to a Massachusetts organization that is leading the charge to make media literacy a mandatory part of Massachusetts’ educational standards.

The Massachusetts Media Literacy Consortium (MMLC) is doing everything from creating educational curriculum to supporting legislation to help make media literacy a part of every Massachusetts student’s education.

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Media Literacy Is Making a Move

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The MMLC is dedicated to bringing media literacy to the Massachusetts educational system.

It’s an exciting time for the media literacy movement as the Massachusetts legislature debates a bill that would:

. . .equip students with the knowledge and skills for accessing, analyzing, evaluating, creating and participating in the 21st century media culture, and to ensure students develop the independent thinking and critical analysis skills needed to navigate the messages of a media-saturated world, the department of elementary and secondary education shall authorize and assist in the implementation of programs on teaching media literacy. To read the full bill click here.

Thank you for all that you are doing to promote media literacy, MMLC.

Does your school include media literacy?

Would you like to bring film analysis into your classroom? Contact us here or at info@labragirlfilmproject.org

Check out the MMLC’s Facebook page here.

Or, join their twitter conversation here.

Follow Labragirl, too! 

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Bring Labragirl into your classroom. Contact us at info@labragirlfilmproject.org or fill out our Interest & Inquiry Form.

Media Literacy & Classroom Technology

Welcome to the Labragirl Film Project’s weekly film literacy discussion. Every Monday we provide a resource, activity, or methodological conversation to help you bring film analysis into your classroom. This week we look at a video produced by Edutopia that talks about technology in the modern educational process.

Edutopia is run by The George Lucas Educational Foundation, an organization that aims to improve K-12 learning by documenting, disseminating, and advocating for innovative strategies that enable students to succeed in the classroom.

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The Modern Teacher & Technology

When used in an innovative manner, technology has the potential to reinforce critical thinking skills and enable students to be active participants in their own education.

When you create you take ownership of your learning. You understand it in a very different way. . .

—Adam Bellow, Outstanding Young Educator of the Year, ISTE 2011.

What are your thoughts?  

Do you use technology in your classroom?

Would you like to bring a Labragirl Film Project film production & film analysis camp to your students? Click here.

For information about Edutopia and integrated studies: Click here.

You can also find Edutopia on Facebook or follow them on Twitter.

Follow Labragirl, too! 

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Bring Labragirl into your classroom. Contact us at info@labragirlfilmproject.org or fill out our Interest & Inquiry Form.

The Power of Film

Welcome to the Labragirl Film Project’s weekly film literacy discussion. Every Monday morning Labragirl provides a resource, activity, or methodological discussion to help incorporate film analysis into your classroom.  This week we take a look at film director Beeban Kidron’s speech  “The Shared Wonder of Film” from TED Talks conference in London last year. Kidron talks about the power of film to create shared experiences. This is something Labragirl Film Project brings to K-16 history and social studies classrooms.

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TED ( Technology, Entertainment, Design)  Talks  is a  global conference that encourages the exchanges of ideas. Last year at London TED Talks, director Beeban Kidron spoke about the “The Shared Wonder of Film.” Kidron is a co-founder of FILMCLUB, an organization dedicated to sharing a love of film with children.

Let’s watch and discuss.

Labragirl Film Project agrees with Beeban Kidron; movies do have the power to create a shared narrative experience and help shape world views for children (and adults!)

What do you think of Kidrons’ speech?

Do you agree?  

Share with your students and let us know about your conversations.

Let’s talk film!

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Bring Labragirl into your classroom. Contact us at info@labragirlfilmproject.org or fill out our Interest & Inquiry Form.

Mad Authenticity: Television Portrayals of Women from the 60s II

Welcome to the Labragirl Film Project’s weekly film literacy discussion. Every Monday morning Labragirl provides a resource, activity, or methodological discussion to help incorporate film analysis into your classroom.

This week we invite Cecilia Portillo back to continue her discussion about the portrayal of women in AMC’s Mad Men. Last week, Cecilia explored Mad Men’s portrayal of the homemaker. This week, Cecilia continues her conversation as she explores the portrayal of the 1960s modern woman.

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Cecilia Portillo, Guest Blogger

As we discussed in Mad Authenticity I, each of the female characters in the TV show Mad Men plays an important role in showcasing the problems and experiences common to women in the 1960s. Today we’ll explore our ideas of the modern woman and how these ideas shape the characters of Joan Harris and Peggy Olson.

 

Modern Women: Joan & Peggy

Joan and Peggy are two strong female characters in AMC’s Mad Men. Their story lines shape our understanding of office gender relations during the 1960s. {Click on image for source information.}

The characters Joan Harris and Peggy Olson are crucial to our understanding of women’s role in the workplace during the 60s. Both women are quietly ambitious, clever, and intelligent. In addition, both experience the negative side of being women in a male-defined space. Through these visual representations, viewers can see the struggle that women faced when entering the workforce—a place where sexual harassment and discrimination were both common and standard practice.

“Why is it that every time a man takes you out to lunch around here, you’re the dessert?” —Peggy Olson

Joan & Peggy, fan favorites, literally show the audience how women have fought—in many ways— to reach important and respectful positions in the professional sphere. In the clip below, we see these two women discussing the sexism and disrespect they encounter. Although Joan’s response to Peggy’s unease would not typically be considered enlightening or helpful, it is prudent to recognize that her mentality was one shared by many women entering the workforce at this time.

What do you think about the portrayal of women from the the 1906s in “Mad Men?”

Peggy Olson (Elisabeth Moss), Betty Draper (January Jones) and Joan Harris (Christina Hendricks) {Click on image for source information.}

 Let’s keep the conversation going. . .  

How can the depiction of a historical era on TV challenge what we thought we knew about a time period?

How do our modern conceptions shape our look at the past?

 - Cecilia 

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Bring Labragirl into your classroom. Contact us at info@labragirlfilmproject.org or fill out our Interest & Inquiry Form.